Chillida Eduardo
Chillida Eduardo
Chillida Eduardo
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Chillida Eduardo

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  • Chillida Eduardo (1924-2002)

Eduardo Chillida was born in 1924 in the Spanish Basque region. From 1943 to 1947, he studied architecture at the University of Madridbut did not finish his studies. In 1948, he lived in Paris for three years and exhibited his work at the Salon de Mai.

In 1951 he moved to Hernani (Spain) and created abstract sculptures in wrought iron, thus taking up the tradition of the master wrought iron workers of the Basque Country.

Eduardo Chillida's work consists of defining the void that animates the material. He works with iron, carves granite, alabaster, steel, wood, models chamotte clay, and designs imaginary labyrinths. Throughout the world, Chillida created numerous monumental sculptures for public commissions.

The artist also produced an imposing graphic oeuvre, mainly engravings, in which the emphasis is put on white, suggesting the opposition of the full and the empty. His engravings will illustrate numerous literary works. Interested in the thought of the philosopher Martin Heidegger, Chillida produced the work "Art and Space" (1968).

Throughout his life as an artist, Eduardo Chillida was awarded an impressive number of prizes a.o. the Venice Biennale to the Kandinsky, from the Wilhem Lehmbruck to the Principe de Asturias, from the German Kaiserring and the Imperial prize in Japan. In 2000, he created his foundation in Hernani, the Chillida-Leku (the "Chillida-Place" in Basque).


    • "Antzo VII" 
    • Etching on Rives BFK with China paper
    • 1985
    • Numbered 38/50
    • Dimensions with frame: H 78 x W 63,5 cm 
    • Dimensions of the image: H 12 x W 27 cm
    • Literature: Van der Koelen 85008  published by G. Belgeonne, Bruxelles and printed by Taller Hatz, San Sebastian.